Sphero

Sphero

Sphero is being used to teach computer science concepts and/or supplement other subjects.

They are incredibly versatile and easily integrated into a variety of learning initiatives such as personalized learning and project-based learning.

This workshop will immerse your students into the world of problem solving, an introduction into robotics, and engaging students to learn to code. We will provide the Spheros and a fully scoped and sequenced curriculum.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Using advanced hardware technology to provide students foundational skills that develop critical thinking, synthesizing information, and real-world problem solving to life. 
  • Using advanced hardware technology to provide students foundational skills that develop critical thinking, synthesizing information, and real-world problem solving to life. 
  • Our Experience: We use spheros in our WCTD after-school coding classes for students ages 7-12
  • We also use spheros in our summer programs, teaching advanced math and getting students engaged in math competencies

Age Groups:

  • Grades pre-k-5: Elementary aged students are grasping early concepts of programming through block coding while fostering 21st century skills through activities such as replicating the solar system, programming characters in a story, or painting geometric shapes with the robot. Students are exposed to real world problems and the 4C’s (collaboration, communication, creativity, and critical thinking).
  • Grades 6-8: Middle and high school aged students explore advanced concepts of logic, design thinking, and computer science. Students use the more complex variables, sensors, and text programming of Sphero to take programming to the next level and learn the foundations of JavaScript
  • Grades 9-12: In higher education and post-secondary learning environments, learners are using Sphero to provide a hands-on method to learn the programming language JavaScript and advanced coding skills. Sphero’s built-in sensors are also used to measure forces and gather data, such as acceleration, velocity, and pitch, during scientific experiments.
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